English at Holystone

English Curriculum - Statement of Intent

At Holystone, we believe that language and literacy is fundamental to the overall development of our children and their access to the curriculum in all its aspects. We aim to deliver quality teaching of spoken language, reading, writing and vocabulary as integral aspects of the teaching of every subject. Fluency in the English language is an essential foundation for success in all subjects and underpins all aspects of the school's Core Values of Respect, Resilience, Independence and Community.  

English is a core subject in the National Curriculum and our aim is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. Through our imaginative delivery of the National Curriculum for English, we aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate

 

Independence

Resilience

Community

Respect

Reading at Holystone

 

Word Reading

Comprehension

 

Reading Intent

At Holystone, we believe that language and literacy is fundamental to the overall development of our children and their access to the curriculum in all its aspects. We aim to deliver quality teaching of spoken language, reading, writing and vocabulary as integral aspects of the teaching of every subject. Fluency in the English language is an essential foundation for success in all subjects and underpins all aspects of the school's Core Values of Respect, Resilience, Independence and Community.  

English is a core subject in the National Curriculum and our aim is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. Through our imaginative delivery of the National Curriculum for English, we aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate

 

Reading Implementation

By the end of Key Stage 1, children will have been taught to:

• Read common exception words

• Read words with contractions and understand role of apostrophe

• Read aloud accurately books that are consistent with taught phonic knowledge and re-read to build fluency

• Apply phonic knowledge to decode most words quickly and accurately when they have been frequently encountered

• Read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes for all 40+ phonemes

• Read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain graphemes taught so far

• Sound out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation

• Read words containing common suffixes

• Read for pleasure

 

By the end of Key Stage 2, children will have been taught to:

  • Apply growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology) to read aloud and understand new words
  • Read further exception words
  • Note unusual correspondence between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word
  • Read for pleasure

 

This is how it works

Daily phonics sessions are taught in Reception and Key Stage 1 (see phonics document for more information)

Reading books in Reception, Year 1 and some of Year 2 are changed once a week and sent home to consolidate after being taught by the teacher or TA

Key Stage 2 and Year 2 (where appropriate) use Accelerated Reader to enable children to choose appropriate level books to read independently, improve resilience and ensure there is a clear comprehension of what is read. AR sessions take place for 20-30 minutes every day.

‘Book Talk’ sessions take place during AR reading time from Y2 upwards. This is a pens-free session in order to promote verbal, in-depth discussions of the text to promote a love of reading.

In Key Stage 2, each class teaches an explicit reading lesson at least once per week (on average over the year)

Whole-class Reading for Pleasure sessions take place at least once per week in all classrooms

By the time children leave Year 6 they will have covered a wide genre of texts and styles which will foster their love for reading

Links with other areas of the curriculum are made during reading time, and other curriculum lessons, to provide children the opportunity to apply their reading skills in other areas

The Library Bus visits school from the wider community once a half-term for children to choose a book to read for pleasure

 

This is what adults do

Encourage a love of reading by giving it a high profile within school

Identify those children who need extra support in order to provide them with catch-up sessions

Carry out learning walks to maintain high-quality teaching of reading

Share books that they are reading with the children and recommend texts based on their reading choices

Deliver a reading assembly once a fortnight in KS2 to celebrate reading achievements, give out certificates and awards, and share recommended reads with the children

Promote reading through displays around school, such as ‘if you like….try….’, ‘reading through time’, ‘read the alphabet’, etc.

Regularly update our AR library through the purchase of up-to-date texts

Ensure there is a diverse range of texts available to read to encourage respect

Read a class novel to the children on a daily basis

Attend relevant training as and when needed

 

This is how we support

Work may be differentiated so that all children are able to meet the learning intention

Small group/1:1 adult support is given where required

We use teacher assessment, star reading tests and NTS assessments to identify any child who requires additional support in specific areas

Provide low level, high interest reading books, e.g. Big Cat Progress, Barrington Stoke and Phonics Books (Totem, Talisman and Magic Belt Series).

 

This is how we challenge

Provide a range of high level reading books that are age appropriate

Higher level questions are provided to stretch the learning within the lesson

Small group sessions are provided, where possible, with texts and questions pitched at a higher level

This is how we ensure all children can access the curriculum

By providing visual/practical prompts

Teaching lessons using a range of different techniques, e.g. multi-sensory approach

More frequent repetition and revisiting to help make it stick

Additional adult support is provided for children who need it

Reading catch-up sessions are provided where appropriate

 

Reading Impact

This is what you might typically see

Children who are engaged and self-motivated

Discussions centred around books and literature

Children talking positively about reading, sharing and reflecting on their learning and how it relates to real life situations

Children who are able to use a range of strategies for decoding words, not solely relying on phonics by the end of Key Stage 2

 

This is how we know how well our pupils are doing

Adults in school listen to every child read regularly

In Key Stage 2 and some of Year 2, children complete a Star Reader test each term which gives them a reading age, Norm Reference Standardised Score (NRSS) and Student Growth Percentile

An NTS reading assessment is carried out once per term from Year 1 – Year 6. From this data, each child is monitored on their ‘flight path’ to check that they are progressing steadily

Children’s AR data is checked by staff, along with the volume of reading taking place, the number of quizzes taken and the percentages children are scoring on quizzes

Governors are invited into school and work alongside the English lead to hear a sample children read across the school

Pupil Voice interviews

Planning audits take place to ensure that reading lessons are being taught within English time

 

This is the impact of the teaching

Children have developed the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information

Children can read easily, fluently and with good understanding

Children of all abilities are able to succeed in reading lessons

Children have read a range of books by different authors (including fiction, non-fiction and poetry) and appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage

The % of children working at ARE within each year group will be at least in line with national averages

The % of children working at Greater Depth within each year group will be at least in line with national averages

 

Independence

Resilience

Community

Respect

Writing at Holystone

 
 

Text Structure and Features

Grammar and Punctuation

Transcription

Plan, Draft, Edit and Evaluate

Language and Vocabulary

 Intent

At Holystone, we believe that language and literacy is fundamental to the overall development of our children and their access to the curriculum in all its aspects. We aim to deliver quality teaching of spoken language, reading, writing and vocabulary as integral aspects of the teaching of every subject. Fluency in the English language is an essential foundation for success in all subjects and underpins all aspects of the school's Core Values of Respect, Resilience, Independence and Community.  

English is a core subject in the National Curriculum and our aim is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. Through our imaginative delivery of the National Curriculum for English, we aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate

 

Implementation

By the end of Key Stage 1, children will have been taught to:

Text Structure and Features

• Understand the features of a wide range of texts, including stories, poems, plays and non-fiction books

• Retell a wide range of stories, eg. fairy stories and traditional tales

• Recognise simple, recurring language and discuss favourite words and phrases

• Write for different purposes, including narratives, poetry and about personal experiences (real and fictional)

Grammar and Punctuation

• Demarcate most sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks and exclamation marks correctly when required

• Use commas in lists, and apostrophes for the contracted form and for singular possession

• Use sentences with different forms: statements, commands, questions and exclamations

• Use expanded noun phrases

• Use present/past tense correctly and consistently, including progressive forms of verbs

• Use subordinating conjunctions (when, if, that, because) and co-ordinating conjunctions (or, and, but)

Transcription

• Sit correctly at table holding pencil correctly

• Name letters of the alphabet in order

• Form correctly-oriented lower-case and capital letters

• Start using diagonal/horizontal strokes to join letters and know which letters are best left unjoined

• Use correct spacing between letters and words

• Segment spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling many correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others

 • Spell the days of the week

• Add suffixes and prefixes to words

• Learn new ways of spelling phonemes for which one or more spellings are already known

• Spell common exception words and those with contractions

Plan, Draft, Edit and Evaluate

  • Plan/say aloud what they are going to write, sentence by sentence
  • Proof-read for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation and make corrections with support

• Read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear

Language and Vocabulary

• Recognise and use simple recurring literary language in stories and poems

• Discuss and clarify meanings of new words, making links to known vocabulary

By the end of Key Stage 2, children are taught to:

Text Structure and Features

• Summarise and present familiar stories in their own words

• Summarise main ideas from more than one paragraph using evidence

• Use knowledge of language and structure gained from stories, plays, poetry and non-fiction in their writing

• Reflect understanding of audience and purpose though choice of grammar, vocabulary and structure

• In fiction, consider how authors develop character and setting

• Be exposed to wide range of books including myths, legends, fairy stories, modern fiction, fiction from literary heritage and books from other cultures

• Evaluate how authors use language and consider effect on the reader

• Use a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs

• Use further organisational and presentational devices such as headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text

Grammar and Punctuation

• Use verb tenses consistently and correctly throughout their writing

• Punctuate bullet points consistently

• Use a wider range of cohesive devices (repetition of word/phrase, adverbials and ellipsis)

• Identify formal/informal structures eg question tags, subjunctive form

• Know and understanding the differences between spoken and written language

• Use a range of punctuation and grammatical features, including relative pronouns, adverbs for possibility, parenthesis, commas, expanded noun phrases, active & passive voice, hyphens, semi-colons, colons and dashes.

Transcription

• Write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed, choosing whether or not to join specific letters

• Use the first three or four letters of a word to check spelling, meaning or both of these in a dictionary

• Use a thesaurus to look for suitable synonyms

• Understand and use a range of prefixes and suffixes

• Spell some words with silent letters

• Use possessive apostrophe for plurals and understand the difference between plural and possessive -s

• Distinguish between homophones and other words that are often confused

Plan, Draft, Edit and Evaluate

• Use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words

• Identify audience and purpose of writing

• Note and develop initial ideas drawing on reading

• Select appropriate grammar and punctuation and understand how these can change/enhance meaning

• Use a wide range of cohesive devices within sentences and between ideas/paragraphs

• Use further organisational and presentational devices to structure text

• Assess effectiveness of own and others’ writing

• Propose changes to grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to enhance meaning/effectiveness

• Ensure correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register

• Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors

• Ensure the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing

Language and Vocabulary

• Use knowledge of language from stories, plays and poetry to enhance the effectiveness of their writing

• Select appropriate language and vocabulary to reflect their understanding of audience and purpose

• Become familiar with the language of writing eg figurative language, imagery, style and effect

• Develop characters, settings and atmosphere using language and vocabulary from reading/books

• Integrate dialogue to advance action and convey character

• Use dictionaries (and thesauruses) to check meaning of new words/language

• Understand the following terminology: modal verb, relative pronoun; relative clause; parenthesis, bracket, dash; and cohesion, ambiguity

• Understand the following terminology: Subject, object; active, passive; synonym, antonym; and ellipsis, hyphen, colon, semi-colon, bullet points

 

This is how it works

There may be a ‘hook’ to start a writing unit, e.g. a book, a picture, a film.

Each lesson is planned and the needs of each child are taken into account so that resources (including TA support) can be prepared/implemented.

Text are chosen/created to set high expectations and to mirror the grammatical features planned in for the unit.

There is a need for clear and purposeful modelling by staff where they demonstrate expectations, word choices and thought processes.

Staff may use support materials e.g. working walls, word banks, writing toolkits

 

This is what adults do

Plan exciting progressive lessons which build on prior knowledge, sometimes

linking to other areas of the curriculum.

Choose texts that will engage children and prompt discussion.

Celebrate writing across the school, e.g. Remarkable Writer Award each term

Showcase writing where a child has shown good progress in their handwriting towards their Golden Pencil or Pen Licence where appropriate

Provide opportunities for writing for real purposes, e.g. Local Authority writing competitions, poetry to be published by Young Writers and purchased by the local community, writing book reviews for the school newsletter

Teachers identify the areas that their children will need to be specifically taught, even if this means tracking back to objectives from previous years

Interventions on specific areas of weakness will be carried out by teaching assistants.

Teachers will moderate across year groups and partner schools

Create a supportive, learning environment that engages children’s interest in

the topic being studied e.g. visual prompts, vocabulary choices

Regular book scrutiny, pupil voice and planning audits.

Whole school professional development.

 

This is how we support

Work might be differentiated at the planning stage so that all children are able

to meet the learning intention. Alternative targets or smaller steps may be given.

Visual aids, word banks or prompts may be used to give children confidence to

make choices in their writing.

Small group/1:1 adult support given where required – allowing for a change in

pace or a specific focus.

Set high standards and maintain expectations

Opportunities to record ideas using a range of alternative media.

We use teacher and self-assessment to identify any child who requires additional support in specific areas.

These pupils will then receive additional support through intervention groups or in-class support

 

This is how we challenge

Additional activities/targets to stretch the learning within the lesson

Small group work with alternative/extended discussion points

Specific teaching on advanced/complex features

This how we ensure all children can access the curriculum

Children are identified and discussed at Pupil Progress Meetings if concerns are present

By providing visual/practical prompts

Teaching lessons using a range of different techniques

More frequent repetition and revisiting to help make it stick

SEND children have an IEP with specific targets, which are supported from home

 

Impact

This is what you might typically see

Independent learners who are engaged and are proud of the writing they produce

Resilient writers

Children keen to include new vocabulary/grammatical techniques within their writing

A learning environment where mutual respect is celebrated and there is an acceptance that using resources and toolkits is what good writers do

Children talking, sharing and reflecting upon their learning

 

This is how we know how well our pupils are doing

Lessons are planned with children prior knowledge

Marking and feedback by teacher

Displays of work in classes and corridors

Teachers use the Target Tracker statements monitor progress and areas of development

Book scrutiny, pupil voice and planning audits.

This is the impact of the teaching

Children have acquired a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for writing

Children use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas

Children write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences

Children can see how vocabulary choices can change the overall impact or inferred meaning of a piece of writing.

Children are able to create imagery in the mind of a reader

Children are able to affect their reader emotionally.

Children can transfer their skills into foundation subjects.

The % of children working at ARE within each year group will be at least in line with national averages

The % of children working at Greater Depth within each year group will be at least in line with national averages